15 comments

  1. Comment by The UK government pays me to write open source all day | Quick People Blog posted on

    […] The transparency also benefits those outside of GDS. Want to the rules for the state pension calculator? Just look at its source. Found a bug with the bank holidays page? You can submit a pull request to fix it. […]

  2. Comment by SeanF posted on

    I love the concept...well done gov.uk....hoping to follow in your footsteps here in Ireland

  3. Comment by Moving on from W+K – Roo Reynolds posted on

    [...] might already have heard of GDS and the single government domain (GOV.UK beta) project, which is rather exciting. If not, here’s Danny O’Brien writing about poacher turned gamekeeper, Tom Loosemore, [...]

  4. Comment by That was the local government week that was « We Love Local Government posted on

    [...] to look. The code is open source and therefore freely available, fixes are being contributed by the public and the beta is changing on a dailybasis. They’re up front about what’s not there (yet) but [...]

  5. Comment by GOV.UK beta | nicepaul.com posted on

    [...] send it back to us for review and inclusion on the website. This isn’t just a possibility – it’s actually happening, and GOV.UK already has user-submitted code running part of the bank holiday [...]

  6. Comment by BITTER GRITTER: Beware Inferior Private Sector Product « The Dan Slee Blog posted on

    [...] I’m not a webbie but even I can see the value in being able to make changes and tweaks suggested by people and there’s a great piece on it here on the Cabinet Office digital blog. [...]

  7. Comment by BITTER GRITTER: Beware Inferior Private Sector Product « The Dan Slee Blog posted on

    [...] I’m not a webbie but even I can see the value in being able to make changes and tweaks suggested by people and there’s a great piece on it here on the Cabinet Office digital blog. [...]

  8. Comment by durathor posted on

    Hmm - I doubt a minor change like this would have cost the (so far unattributed) 20K. Also as an aside, "After careful testing and checks" this was put live (so the dev was free as open source, but govt still needed to perform due diligence before merging and putting live).

    If this was outsourced IT, the testing and deployment time would be billed by the hour, the cost of which would lead to much gnashing of teeth. With an internal cost tho, despite the huge advertised salaries for GDS jobs (plugged elsewhere on this site), the real cost of even a very minor change such as this is invisible.

  9. Comment by Government as a local platform? | bm.wel.by posted on

    [...] future to look. The code is open source and therefore freely available, fixes are being contributed by the public and the beta is changing on a daily basis. They’re up front about what’s not there [...]

  10. Comment by A quiet revolution in UK government IT: open source ousting big-vendor lock-in « Tim Anderson’s ITWriting posted on

    [...] though that this particular team is doing inspiring work. This blog post from GDS yesterday describes how open source participation was used to fix a government web site; it may seem a small thing, but [...]

  11. Comment by Jim posted on

    Comparing a simple content change to a totally spurious and inaccurate claim of £20,000 for a single line change is a bit disingenuous isn't it.

  12. Comment by Day 2 of GOV.UK- more iteration | Government Digital Service posted on

    [...] Calendars: As we blogged earlier we have updated the bank holidays section with Matthew Sommerville’s [...]

  13. Comment by Jamie Cobbett (@jamiecobbett) posted on

    From £20,000 to 3 minutes in a web browser (2.5 minutes for the fork-fix-request, 30 seconds for the pull approval).

    I love the use of pull-request best-practice -- on a branch... named "fix_scotland" 🙂

  14. Comment by Matthew Somerville (@dracos) posted on

    Just for (boring) clarity, the 2nd January bank holiday can be moved if it needs to be (by Royal Proclamation); that wasn't needed this year, as the 2nd was a Monday, and the law on bank holidays automatically moves the New Year's Day holiday to the 3rd if the 1st is a Sunday.

    I've written up some interesting discoveries starting from this fix at http://www.dracos.co.uk/scribblings/bad-bank-holidays/ - did Scotland not have the correct New Year's holiday last year?

  15. Comment by Nathan Pitman (@nathanpitman) posted on

    This is quite simply brilliant. Kudos to everyone involved - keep up the great work!